High School Course of Studies

Advisory

Mindfulness is a powerful tool that supports students in calming themselves, focusing their attention, and interacting effectively with others, all critical skills for functioning well in school and in life.  Incorporating mindfulness into education has been linked to improving academic and social and emotional learning. Also, mindfulness strengthens some underlying development processes—such as focus, resilience, and self-soothing—that will help students in the long run.  To begin the day, students will work with their teacher on mindfulness strategies.  This is also time for news and important updates in scheduling.

Algebra I

This course is the first of a four-year sequence.  It is designed to emphasize the study of multiple representations of linear and non-linear functions.  This course formalizes and extends the mathematics that students learned in Pre-Algebra.  The Algebra I course covers various concepts from the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks ranging from number and quantity, algebra, functions, and statistics and probability standards.  Instructional time will focus on four critical areas:  (1) deepen and extend understanding of linear and exponential relationships; (2) contrast linear and exponential relationships with each other and engage in methods for analyzing, solving, and using quadratic functions; (3) extend the laws of exponents to square and cube roots; and (4) apply linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend.  Students will apply The Standards for Mathematical Practice which complement the content standards in each unit.  Students will increasingly build their engagement with the subject matter as they grow in mathematical maturity and expertise throughout the course.  They will also build on Massachusetts’s Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) competencies in each lesson.  Students will apply The Reading Standards for Literacy which complement the content standards in each unit.  Students will use multi-sensory, hands-on manipulatives to solve problems where algebra concepts are applied in real-world scenarios.  In order for students to meet the high academic standards and expectations, their math instruction incorporates individualized instruction, related services, supports, and accommodations to allow them access to the general Algebra I curriculum.

Geometry

This course is the second of a four-year sequence.  It is designed to emphasize the study of complex geometric situations.  This course formalizes and extends the mathematics that students previously learned in Algebra I.  The Geometry course covers various concepts from the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks ranging from number and quantity, geometry, and statistics and probability standards.  Instructional time will focus on six critical areas:  (1) establish criteria for congruence of triangles based on rigid motions; (2) establish criteria for similarity of triangles based on dilations and proportional reasoning; (3) informally develop explanations of circumference, area, and volume formulas; (4) apply the Pythagorean Theorem to the coordinate plane; (5) prove basic geometric theorems; and (6) extend work with probability.  Students will apply The Standards for Mathematical Practice which complement the content standards in each unit.  Students will increasingly build their engagement with the subject matter as they grow in mathematical maturity and expertise throughout the course.  They will also build on Massachusetts’s Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) competencies in each lesson.  Students will apply The Reading Standards for Literacy which complement the content standards in each unit.  Students will use multi-sensory, hands-on manipulatives to solve problems where geometry concepts are applied in real-world scenarios.  In order for students to meet the high academic standards and expectations, their math instruction incorporates individualized instruction, related services, supports, and accommodations to allow them access to the general Geometry curriculum. 

Algebra II

This course is the third of a four-year sequence.  It is designed to emphasize the study of building on linear, quadratic, and exponential functions to extend students repertoire of functions to include logarithmic, polynomial, rational, and radical functions.  This course formalizes and extends the mathematics that students previously learned in Geometry.  The Algebra II course covers various concepts from the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks ranging from number and quantity, algebra, functions, and statistics and probability standards.  Instructional time will focus on four critical areas:  (1) relate arithmetic of rational expression to arithmetic of rational numbers; (2) expand understandings of functions and graphing to include trigonometric functions; (3) synthesize and generalize functions and extend understanding of exponential functions to logarithmic functions; and (4) relate data display and summary statistics to probability and explore a variety of data collection methods.  Students will apply The Standards for Mathematical Practice which complement the content standards in each unit.  Students will increasingly build their engagement with the subject matter as they grow in mathematical maturity and expertise throughout the course.  They will also build on Massachusetts’s Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) competencies in each lesson.  Students will apply The Reading Standards for Literacy which complement the content standards in each unit.  Students will enhance their learning by implementing technology to introduced them to new topics throughout the course.  Students will use multi-sensory, hands-on manipulatives to solve problems where algebra concepts are applied in real-world scenarios.  In order for students to meet the high academic standards and expectations, their math instruction incorporates individualized instruction, related services, supports, and accommodations to allow them access to the general Algebra II curriculum. 

Financial Algebra

This course the fourth of a four-year sequence.  It is designed to emphasize the study of finance in students’ everyday lives.  This course formalizes and extends the mathematics that students previously learned in Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II.  The Financial Algebra course is a crosswalk between the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks related to mathematics, the Massachusetts Career Development Education (CDE) benchmarks related to development of lifelong learning, and the Vocational Technical Education Frameworks (VTE) related to business.  This crosswalk creates a unique course where students continue learning and applying mathematics throughout their high school career.  This develops a senior year transition math course to address various math deficiencies while showing students mathematics they will encounter beyond high school.  Financial Algebra helps students gain the skills they need as they start to assume adult responsibilities.  Topics covered will revolve around five core topics :  (1) financial responsibility and decision making, (2) the economy, government, and financial planning, (3) spending and credit, (4) saving and investing; and (5) retirement and estate planning.  Students will apply The Standards for Mathematical Practice which complement the content standards in each unit.  Students will increasingly build their engagement with the subject matter as they grow in mathematical maturity and expertise throughout the course.  They will also build on Massachusetts’s Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) competencies in each lesson.  Students will apply The Reading Standards for Literacy which complement the content standards in each unit.  Students will enhance their learning by implementing technology to introduced them to new topics throughout the course.  Students will use multi-sensory, hands-on manipulatives to solve problems where algebra concepts are applied in real-world scenarios.  In order for students to meet the high academic standards and expectations, their math instruction incorporates individualized instruction, related services, supports, and accommodations to allow them access to the general Financial Algebra curriculum. 

English 9/10 (Odd Year)

In this course, students develop their literary analysis skills in reading assignments, writing assignments, and class activities. The major genres include fiction, poetry, and non-fiction. In their writing and speaking, students learn to express clear ideas about a variety of topics, including those tied to the readings. Formal papers will cover a range of forms, including narrative and analytical.  They will involve a multi-stage process, including brainstorming, outlining, drafting, and revising. The course establishes the groundwork for all subsequent high school courses through its focus on reading, writing, discussion, vocabulary, and grammar skills. The English 9/10 course covers various concepts from the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks.  Students will also build on Massachusetts’s Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) competencies in each lesson.  Students will apply The Reading Standards for Literacy which complement the content standards in each unit.  To access the general curriculum successfully, students will be provided additional supports and services as identified in their IEPs.  These supports include instructional learning, Universal Design, instructional accommodations, and assistive technology as indicated.  

English 9/10 (Even Year)

This is a course in writing and literature. The selected works fit into the essential course question of how identity is formed. Students will practice writing increasingly sophisticated essays and move beyond the five-paragraph structure. Students also hone their speaking and listening skills through active engagement in class discussions, presentations and projects. Students continue to build their mastery of poetry, grammar, and vocabulary.  A goal of the course is for students to become more independent in developing their ability to analyze text and revise their writing. The English 9/10 course covers various concepts from the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks.  Students will also build on Massachusetts’s Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) competencies in each lesson.  Students will apply The Reading Standards for Literacy which complement the content standards in each unit.  To access the general curriculum successfully, students will be provided additional supports and services as identified in their IEPs.  These supports include instructional learning, Universal Design, instructional accommodations, and assistive technology as indicated.

English 11/12 (Odd Year)

Students continue the study of grammar, vocabulary, composition, and literature with a focus on the study of all genres in American literature. This course is designed to build upon the skill instruction in reading comprehension and writing development from the previous courses. Students will work on mastering the multi-paragraph essay with emphasis placed on content and mechanics. The English 11/12 course covers various concepts from the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks.  Students will also build on Massachusetts’s Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) competencies in each lesson.  Students will apply The Reading Standards for Literacy which complement the content standards in each unit.  To access the general curriculum successfully, students will be provided additional supports and services as identified in their IEPs.  These supports include instructional learning, Universal Design, instructional accommodations, and assistive technology as indicated.  

English 11/12 (Even Year)

Students continue the study of literature with a focus on themes of identity. They will write critical analysis essays and other types of expository writing. Students will continue to develop their research skills and write a college-level research paper. They will continue to study vocabulary to improve their reading comprehension and writing as they make formal and informal oral presentations. The English 11/12 course covers various concepts from the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks.  The course will also build on Massachusetts’s Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) competencies in each lesson.  Students will apply The Reading Standards for Literacy which complement the content standards in each unit.  To access the general curriculum successfully, students will be provided additional supports and services as identified in their IEPs.  These supports include instructional learning, Universal Design, instructional accommodations, and assistive technology as indicated. 

World History I

This course is the first of a two-year sequence of courses.  It is designed to build on the students’ understanding of world geography and civilizations from middle school.  Students study world history from approximately 500 to 1800 CE. They study these topics by researching and exploring guiding questions such as, “How do ideas migrate across cultures?” and “What brings about change in societies?”   The  students apply ninth grade reading, writing, speaking and listening skills.  They will learn vocabulary and concepts related to history and social sciences.  The World History I course covers various concepts from the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks.  Students will also build on Massachusetts’s Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) competencies in each lesson.  Students will apply The Reading Standards for Literacy which complement the content standards in each unit.  To access the general curriculum successfully, students will be provided additional supports and services as identified in their IEPs.  These supports include instructional learning, Universal Design, instructional accommodations, and assistive technology as indicated.  

World History II

This course is the second of a two-year sequence of courses.  It is designed to build on the understanding of world geography and civilizations from middle school and World History I.  Students study world history from approximately 1700 to the present by researching guiding questions such as, “What are the connections between industrialization and imperialism?” and What does it mean to be modern?”  The  students apply tenth grade reading, writing, speaking and listening skills.  They will learn vocabulary and concepts related to history and social sciences.  The World History II course covers various concepts from the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks.  Students will also build on Massachusetts’s Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) competencies in each lesson.  Students will apply The Reading Standards for Literacy which complement the content standards in each unit.  To access the general curriculum successfully, students will be provided additional supports and services as identified in their IEPs.  These supports include instructional learning, Universal Design, instructional accommodations, and assistive technology as indicated. 

United States History II

It is designed for students to begin their study of United States history with a review of the origins and main events of the American Revolution, Constitutional principles, and events of the early Republic. They examine the causes and consequences of the Civil War, industrialization, immigration, Progressivism and the role of the United States in World War I. They explore guiding questions such as “What are some examples of continuity and change in the first 150 years of United States history?” The  students apply eleventh grade reading, writing, speaking and listening skills.  They will learn vocabulary and concepts related to history and social sciences.  The US History I course covers various concepts from the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks.  Students will also build on Massachusetts’s Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) competencies in each lesson.  Students will apply The Reading Standards for Literacy which complement the content standards in each unit.  To access the general curriculum successfully, students will be provided additional supports and services as identified in their IEPs.  These supports include instructional learning, Universal Design, instructional accommodations, and assistive technology as indicated.

Biology I

This course is the first of a two-year sequence of courses designed to encourage students to experience science firsthand.  Through the Problem-Based learning strand, they are immersed in an active learning environment with hands-on and virtual labs, STEM activities research projects, and authentic readings.  Upon concluding of a unit, students acquire the scientific knowledge and data to design, test, and evaluate a solution to the presented problem.  This course formalizes and extends the science that students previously learned in the earlier grades.  The Biology I course covers various concepts from the Massachusetts Curriculum Standards ranging from the nature of life, ecology, and cells.  Instructional time will focus on students explaining additional and more complex phenomena related to genetics, the functioning of organisms, and interrelationships between organisms, populations, and the environment. The standards expect students to apply a variety of science and engineering practices to four core ideas of biology; (1) molecules to organisms; (2) ecosystems; (3) heredity; and (4) biological evolution.  Students will apply The Reading Standards for Literacy which complement the content standards in each unit.  Students will increasingly build their engagement with the subject matter as they grow in science maturity and expertise throughout the course.  They will also build on Massachusetts’s Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) competencies in each lesson.  Students will use multi-sensory models and provide evidence to make claims and explanations about biology relationships in various STE domains.  In order for students to meet the high academic standards and expectations, their science instruction incorporates individualized instruction, related services, supports, and accommodations to allow them access to the general science curriculum.  Students who complete Biology I will take Biology II the following year.

Biology II

This course is the second of a two-year sequence of courses designed to encourage students to experience science firsthand.  Through the Problem-Based learning strand, they are immersed in an active learning environment with hands-on and virtual labs, STEM activities research projects, and authentic readings.  Upon concluding of a unit, students acquire the scientific knowledge and data to design, test, and evaluate a solution to the presented problem.  This course formalizes and extends the science that students previously learned in the earlier grades and Biology I.  The Biology II course covers various concepts from the Massachusetts Curriculum Standards ranging from the genetics, evolution, and diversity of life.  Instructional time will focus on students explaining additional and more complex phenomena related to genetics, the functioning of organisms, and interrelationships between organisms, populations, and the environment. The standards expect students to apply a variety of science and engineering practices to four core ideas of biology; (1) molecules to organisms; (2) ecosystems; (3) heredity; and (4) biological evolution.  Students will apply The Reading Standards for Literacy which complement the content standards in each unit.  Students will increasingly build their engagement with the subject matter as they grow in science maturity and expertise throughout the course.  They will also build on Massachusetts’s Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) competencies in each lesson.  Students will use multi-sensory models and provide evidence to make claims and explanations about biology relationships in various STE domains.  In order for students to meet the high academic standards and expectations, their science instruction incorporates individualized instruction, related services, supports, and accommodations to allow them access to the general science curriculum.  Students who complete Biology II will take Chemistry the following year.

Chemistry

This course is designed to integrate problem-solving support, technology, and real-world application to ensure success in the Chemistry classroom.  Students will encounter personalized learning opportunities to support their unique learning styles, connections to the real world relating abstract concepts and processes to their everyday life, cutting-edge technology that is integrated throughout the curriculum, and rich lab explorations and study supports provide numerous opportunities to practice and reinforce essential chemistry skills.  This course formalizes and extends the science that students previously learned in middle school physical science classes.  The Chemistry course covers various concepts from the Massachusetts Curriculum Standards ranging from matter and its interactions, motion and stability, and energy.    Students will consider how structure and composition at sub-atomic scales explain structure-property relationships in chemistry and influence energy transformations and dissipation of energy during chemical and physical changes.  Instructional time will focus on science and engineering practices related to design and evaluation as well as investigation and modeling.  Students will be expected to apply mathematical reasoning when considering conservation of matter in chemical reactions and in comparing strength of acid-based solution.  Students will apply The Reading Standards for Literacy which complement the content standards in each unit.  Students will increasingly build their engagement with the subject matter as they grow in science maturity and expertise throughout the course.  They will also build on Massachusetts’s Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) competencies in each lesson.  Students will use multi-sensory models and provide evidence to make claims and explanations about chemistry relationships in various STE domains.  In order for students to meet the high academic standards and expectations, their science instruction incorporates individualized instruction, related services, supports, and accommodations to allow them access to the general science curriculum.  Students who complete Chemistry will take Physics the following year.

Intervention

The Academic Skills class provides opportunities for students to address their individual education goals as well as to provide study skills strategies to help the students be successful in their curricular classes. Study skills strategies are addressed formally. The lessons –generated from brain-based research- include but are not limited to direct instruction on: learning style, time management, note-taking, outlining, test taking, study strategies and use of technology. Students apply these strategies to their daily, academic assignments. The students are assessed daily for their learning, participation, preparation, and attitude.

Physical Education and Health 9

This course provides students the continuing opportunity to learn through a developmentally appropriate, comprehensive sequentially planned physical education program aligned with the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks related to Health and Physical Education.  Physical Education in grade 9 emphasizes health-related fitness and develops the skills and habits necessary for a lifetime of activity. The course provides students with opportunities to achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of physical fitness and increase their knowledge of fitness concepts. The program includes skill development and the application of rules and strategies of complex difficulty.  Health provides students with a deeper understanding of age appropriate health issues and equips them to better deal with the social and emotional adjustments of high school. Topics covered include communication skills and healthy relationship building; risk assessment, alcohol, and other drug prevention (including binge drinking); stress and anger management; depression; suicide prevention; personal values development; and human sexuality & sexual health.

Physical Education and Health 10

This course provides students the continuing opportunity to learn through a developmentally appropriate, comprehensive sequentially planned physical education program aligned with the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks related to Health and Physical Education.  Physical Education in grade 10 emphasizes health-related fitness and developing the skills and habits necessary for a lifetime of activity. The course provides students with opportunities to achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of physical fitness and increase their knowledge of fitness concepts. The program includes skill development and the application of rules and strategies of complex difficulty.  Health builds upon the information covered in previous Health Education courses, with an emphasis upon a developmentally appropriate examination of health issues relevant to high school sophomores. Students will build their knowledge base and skills for addressing issues of dating abuse and healthy relationships; stress management and mindfulness practice; healthy sleep habits; and understanding the neuroscience of substance use and abuse.

Physical Education and Health 11

This course provides students the continuing opportunity to learn through a developmentally appropriate, comprehensive sequentially planned physical education program aligned with the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks related to Health and Physical Education.   In this course students will learn and practice the skills necessary to participate in a variety of physical activities. This course is designed to develop physically literate individuals who gain the knowledge, skills, and confidence to enjoy a lifetime of healthful physical activity. Lessons will transition students from skill-based instruction and activity exploration, to self-directed activity and fitness management.  This course emphasizes the need for students to take responsibility for their health. In addition, students will focus on the risks and consequences related to physical activity and personal behavior.

Physical Education and Health 12

This course provides students the continuing opportunity to learn through a developmentally appropriate, comprehensive sequentially planned physical education program aligned with the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks related to Health and Physical Education.  In this course, students will learn and practice the skills necessary to participate in a variety of physical activities. This course is designed to develop physically literate individuals who gain the knowledge, skills, and confidence to enjoy a lifetime of healthful physical activity. Students will have the opportunity to be involved in meaningful movement experiences which provide personal enjoyment and social engagement. Lessons are designed to build and refine skills, engage all students regardless of talent and experience or skill level.  This course continues to build upon the health and wellness concepts of previous courses, while helping each student to focus on understanding and facilitating their developing sense of identity, values, and role(s) in society. Students explore the areas of psychological and moral development, character education and decision making, racial identity and racism in society, and adolescent mental health and substance abuse prevention.

Signal Success

With Signal Success, students develop important non-cognitive skills, explore careers and future planning, and build the skills and assets to compete for jobs and internships. The curriculum spirals through these three major content domains to allow students multiple chances to practice skills and deepen understanding. All lessons are designed to engage students with a multi-modal approach and strong emphasis on the application of skills and concepts. Students are introduced to new concepts through short case study style readings and activities and then guided through applying these concepts to their own context. The curriculum includes a variety of assessment tools including competency-based portfolio measures, daily reflection options, summative reflection tasks, and survey tools for students and instructors.  Students will apply The Common Core College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards, Massachusetts’s Career Development Education Benchmarks, and the Massachusetts’s Career/Vocational Technical Education Frameworks which complement the content standards in each unit.  Students will increasingly build their engagement with the subject matter as they grow in maturity and expertise throughout the course.  They will also build on Massachusetts’s Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) competencies in each lesson.  In order for students to meet the high academic standards and expectations, their vocational instruction incorporates individualized instruction, related services, supports, and accommodations to allow them access to the general curriculum.

Find, Get, Keep

Each student’s job experience and goals are individually tailored to address identified transition goals. Students are matched with work experiences as opportunities allow. Vocational experience builds upon the basic work skills developed in pre-vocational job training.  Students are supported in community internships by job coaches. Community internships allow for increased job independence and decreased direct supervision. Evaluations on work performance are completed daily by the job coach. Self-assessments/reflections are completed by the student and reviewed with the job coach and teacher.  During this course students will be actively seeking job placements both on campus and off campus.

Social and Emotional Learning 9

This course is designed to improve the social, emotional, and academic skills of students and create supportive relationships among students and between students and their teachers.  The curriculum is built upon five social and emotional competency areas:  social awareness, self-awareness, self-management, relationship skills, and responsible decision-making.  These competencies are identified by research as critical to the healthy development of children and adolescents and their success in school.  Students will learn a variety of social and emotional competencies through various modules in the curriculum such as developing self-awareness and self-management.  Implementing SEL practices provides a strong foundation for creating a safe and supportive learning environment where all students can succeed. It promotes positive outcomes in social and emotional learning as well as academic areas.  Students will increasingly build their engagement with the subject matter as they grow in maturity and expertise throughout the course.  In order for students to meet the high academic standards and expectations, their social and emotional instruction incorporates individualized instruction, related services, supports, and accommodations to allow them access to the general curriculum.

Social and Emotional Learning 10

This course is designed to improve the social, emotional, and academic skills of students and create supportive relationships among students and between students and their teachers.  The curriculum is built upon five social and emotional competency areas:  social awareness, self-awareness, self-management, relationship skills, and responsible decision-making.  These competencies are identified by research as critical to the healthy development of children and adolescents and their success in school.  Students will learn a variety of social and emotional competencies through various modules in the curriculum such as building relationships and resolving conflicts.  Implementing SEL practices provides a strong foundation for creating a safe and supportive learning environment where all students can succeed. It promotes positive outcomes in social and emotional learning as well as academic areas.  Students will increasingly build their engagement with the subject matter as they grow in maturity and expertise throughout the course.  In order for students to meet the high academic standards and expectations, their social and emotional instruction incorporates individualized instruction, related services, supports, and accommodations to allow them access to the general curriculum.

Social and Emotional Learning 11

This course is designed to improve the social, emotional, and academic skills of students and create supportive relationships among students and between students and their teachers.  The curriculum is built upon five social and emotional competency areas:  social awareness, self-awareness, self-management, relationship skills, and responsible decision-making.  These competencies are identified by research as critical to the healthy development of children and adolescents and their success in school.  Students will learn a variety of social and emotional competencies through various modules in the curriculum such as building relationships and resolving conflicts.  Implementing SEL practices provides a strong foundation for creating a safe and supportive learning environment where all students can succeed. It promotes positive outcomes in social and emotional learning as well as academic areas.  Students will increasingly build their engagement with the subject matter as they grow in maturity and expertise throughout the course.  In order for students to meet the high academic standards and expectations, their social and emotional instruction incorporates individualized instruction, related services, supports, and accommodations to allow them access to the general curriculum.

Social and Emotional Learning 12

This course is designed to improve the social, emotional, and academic skills of students and create supportive relationships among students and between students and their teachers.  The curriculum is built upon five social and emotional competency areas:  social awareness, self-awareness, self-management, relationship skills, and responsible decision-making.  These competencies are identified by research as critical to the healthy development of children and adolescents and their success in school.  Students will learn a variety of social and emotional competencies through various modules in the curriculum such as preparing for college and the workforce.  Implementing SEL practices provides a strong foundation for creating a safe and supportive learning environment where all students can succeed. It promotes positive outcomes in social and emotional learning as well as academic areas.  Students will increasingly build their engagement with the subject matter as they grow in maturity and expertise throughout the course.  In order for students to meet the high academic standards and expectations, their social and emotional instruction incorporates individualized instruction, related services, supports, and accommodations to allow them access to the general curriculum.

SEL Teambuilder

Team building allows students to work together in social situations just as they would in the classroom, their daily lives, or down the road in the workplace. How often are they challenged with a task to do with others where they don’t know how to work in these situations? Team building challenges students to problem solve and execute working with others. It shows them how to be accountable.  As the groups progress through the day the activities are tailored to specifically help individuals achieve some goals with the group. Team building allows students to develop stronger relationships and trust among each other. Certain activities can be designed to improve communication and limit conflict in a group.  Team building often consists of two parts for each challenge or activity. There is the initial activity and then afterwards is time for reflection. This is a time where students truly show how much they’ve learned and how far they’ve grown.  Through many different games and activities, students are able to build and develop many different skills that they may not have been able to elsewhere. It is a great time for new experiences and new challenges.

Clinical Groups

Students participate in weekly counseling groups co-led by clinicians and teachers to foster skill improvement, social connections, and communication. Group content will vary with topics that serve the current student population. Clinical groups also include instruction in coping skills, such as mindfulness techniques, to decrease student anxiety and promote attention and focus.

Community Meeting

Restorative Practices build community and can help set things right when the integrity of the community is challenged by harmful behaviors. When people come together for restorative interactions they sit in circles. Circle dialogue is a fundamental element of restorative dialogue. Classroom circles support the two main goals of restorative practices: building community; and responding to harms through dialogue that sets things right.  Restorative practices cultivate a culture in which everyone feels like they belong. They build a particular sense of community in which every member--students, teacher and staff members --feel that they are seen, heard, and respected.

Academic Time

This course addresses the acquisition of practical math, reading and writing skills necessary for independent living as well as improving general academic skills. Students have the opportunity to develop proficiency with application of the major mathematical processes. Additionally, students practice math skills related to daily living, such as: budgeting, banking, maintaining a checking account, earning a paycheck, measurement, and shopping.  The curriculum follows the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks modified to meet the needs of the individual student. are reinforced through the use of varied reading sources including, but not limited to, books, newspapers, magazines, and articles.

APEX Learning

A credit recovery program with a strategy that encourages students to re-take a previously failed course required for high school graduation and earn credit if the student successfully completes the course requirements. Credit Recovery was designed to provide a pathway for high school students who have a history of course failure and help them avoid falling further behind in school. Credit recovery courses are available online through APEX Learning and are scheduled at different times to suit the needs of each individual student.

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Clifford Academy

  399 Lincoln Rd, Walpole, MA 02081

  Phone: (508) 668-7703
  Fax: (508) 660-9639
  Email: cliffordacademy@thehome.org

  PRINCIPAL: Rene Dickhaut

Clifford Academy is a relationship-centered learning community where students, staff, families and community members work collaboratively to develop every student’s academic, social, emotional, physical and ethical potential in a caring and safe environment.